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Get Him to the Greek
53 % by 6 users
(2010)

Pinacle records has the perfect plan to get their sinking company back on track back: a comeback concert in LA featuring Aldous Snow, a fading rockstar who has dropped off the radar in recent years. Record company intern Aaron Green is faced with the monumental task of bringing his idol, out of control rock star Aldous Snow back to LA for his comeback show.

Runtime:
1:49
Released:
June 04, 2010

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Had potential

Reviewed by mol

this movie could have been so much more there was potential... on paper. Russell Grant should stick to stand up acting is not his strong point. Some of the scenes seemed very poorly edited as if they had been shot a week apart. There wasn't much chemistry between the leads probably about 2 or 3 laughs through the entire movie and by the end of the movie my partner had fallen asleep and I felt some sort of weird obligation to see this half arsed attempt at comedy out to the end. Even the music this so called rock god was belting out was bland and uninspired as we are meant to think that he has a better back catalogue than Mick Jagger -shame I wanted to like this but no such luck.

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Absouloutly horrid!

Reviewed by Z0mbieSlay4r360

This had to have been one of the most dumbest movies i've seen in a long time . There was nothing funny about it don't waste your money folks.

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Brand reaching new heights - of utter rubbish

Reviewed by Yido

When I seen the trailers for this movie I have to admit that I expected a lot from it. When I eventually got round to seeing it I have to admit that I was disappointed. The entire story line of the film is quite random and boring to be perfectly honest. The plot doesnt have any real flow to it and some of the scenes in the film can be described as completely stuipd. The attenpts at humour throughout the film which should really have been its strong points are again disappointing as they are nothing but crude, disgusting and predictable. The ending of the story is again a let down and by the time the ending credits came up I had already contimplated trying to escape from this disaster of a movie at least twice! All in all Get him to the Greek is a extremely disapointing movie with the least amount of actually funny scenes I have ever experienced in a "comedy film".

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It'sy Raw

Reviewed by shari

Marveled at the number of creative sequences that keep rolling. It's like, don't look away, you'll miss something. Get your popcorn, go to the restroom, get a good seat, and plan to sit in it the whole time.

Definitely not for children. Adults need to go to confession for even buying a ticket. Strange but wonderful. Weird. Slightly off center of blasphemy.

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funny funny funny

Reviewed by rmoviehog

Why are you still reading this you should be at the cinnema . Go now>>>>>>>

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So much puke

Reviewed by thesubstream

It's not quite Pixar-like, Judd Apatow's streak of very funny, very good films, but it's close. As a producer, he's as close as it gets to Mr. Automatic, going from Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy to The 40-Year-Old Virgin to Talladega Nights to Superbad to Pineapple Express with only a couple Year One's and Walk Hard's to queer the run.

Apatow's done it the right way, by surrounding himself with a gang of truly funny people and by recognizing what a lot of timid, gloss-obsessed Hollywood folks won't: that guys like Jonah Hill, Michael Cera, Steve Carell and Seth Rogan could carry pictures. They're all... these are odd-looking dudes, these Apatowian fellas, and it's hard to make them look good blown up billboard size. But all of them can write their own jokes, all of them are funny, and as Hill proves in the new Get Him to the Greek, all of them can carry the weight of a big film on their back, despite their schlubbiness, despite the films not being SNL spin-offs. There's just talent and comedy, that's both fresh and charmingly old-fashioned.

With Get Him to the Greek there's a weird bit of Hollywood story/actor oddness that evaporates as soon as the picture gets rolling: writer/director Nicholas Stoller is taking characters from a previous film that he directed (that was written by and starred Jason Segel), Forgetting Sarah Marshall, keeping one intact (Russel Brand's rock god Aldous Snow) and slightly tweaking one other (Jonah Hill's disturbed-fan maître d' becomes a shy music intern), and sets them loose in a completely unconnected narrative.

Snow is the last true rockstar, recently fallen hard off the wagon post-a disastrous, career-threatening single about starvation in Africa called "African Child". Worried about slumping record sales and a label-head (the surprisingly entertaining Sean "Diddy" Combs) looking for "the next thing", intern Aaron Green (Hill) suggests the company return to its rock roots and sponsor a gig at the Greek theatre in L.A., to mark the 10th anniversary of a legendary Aldous Snow show. Green is sent to London to collect him, packing an adrenaline shot and instructions to do whatever it takes to get the slippery, deluded, hard-partying rock god to L.A. in three days. Very funny hijinks ensue.

Brand as Snow is the spectacle, the wild spark that animates the whole film. Snow vacillates wildly from petulant artistic preciousness to aggressive junkie posturing to anarchic drug logic and back. Story-wise, tt's a dangerous thing to chance, as the rock-excess thing has been parodied to near-death. Brand, though, limns the edges of his chaos with occasional moments of human frailty. The film notes late in the going that Snow's self-appointed rock messiah is intelligent, and it's a small ignorable moment that speaks to the subtle bits of originality in the film's script and in Brand's performance: he's a pompous idiotic waster in true rock fashion, but there's a cruel, manipulative intelligence underneath it all that helps the whole film feel fresh and funny, even if it's going over well-trod Spinal Tap ground.

The discovery of the film, though, is Jonah Hill as Aaron Green, the spectacular punching bag at the heart of a film that mercilessly visits every kind of humiliation and degradation on him. He stands square in the furnace blast of Snow's rock-superstar excess and the shrivelling, repeated "mind f__ks" of his conniving, unbalanced boss: he pukes, he's sexually assaulted by more than one person, he's threatened, cursed, party to a stabbing. But what makes Hill's performance truly funny is that while he is in essence a nebbish, a victim, a barf-coated ill-looking cannonball of a man he nonetheless retains a really kind of compelling dignity and oddly endearing self-confidence. There's a depth to Hill's performance in this film (and in Forgetting Sarah Marshall as well) that's actually… special. He's not an oversize wild-man, he's not a tiny Michael Cera-esque mumbler. He's doing something new, and it along with everything else in this film is very very funny. 8/10

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