Name: Lizzi312

Most Recent Reviews by Lizzi312

Beverly Hills Chihuahua

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Reviewed by Lizzi312

My 71-year-old Mom dragged me to this film, because none of her friends were willing to see a silly Disney movie. What surprised and interested me most was that the chihuahuas serve as a metaphor for Mexican-Americans. Chloe, a pampered white chihuahua--complete with pink booties and a diamond collar--gets lost in Mexico and encounters a series of adventures while trying to get home. Chloe comes upon a society of wild chihuahuas living in an ancient Aztec city, who help her to get in touch with her inner chihuahua and to take pride in her heritage (read: Mexican heritage). The metaphor of white American vs. Mexican-American is sustained throughout the film. Rachel, a white woman taking care of Chloe for her aunt Viv, is disdainful of Viv's Mexican-American landscape architect (she derogatorily refers to him as a gardener). Chloe is likewise disdainful of the landscape architect's Mexican-American dog. Rachel ultimately learns to appreciate her aunt's landscape architect, picks up a bit of Spanish, and realizes she was being a (racist) snob toward Mexican-Americans. Likewise Chloe. "Beveryly Hills Chihuahua" is a fun, charming, romantic commentary on how white Americans need to learn to appreciate Mexican American culture and stop looking down on Mexican-Americans--disguised as a silly Disney movie about a cute dog.

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Hank and Mike

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Reviewed by Lizzi312

Professional Easter Bunnies are layed off due to corporate downsizing. Mike and Hank love their job breaking into the homes of their customers on Easter-Eve to hide chocolate eggs for the little children. Two bachelors--compared on the DVD box to the Odd Couple--wear their fuzzy pink-and-white Easter Bunny suits 24/7: while sleeping, smoking cigarettes, taking hits from a bong, falling down drunk in an alley, attempting suicide, etc. Things go from bad to worse when one bunny admits to the woman he is in love with that he has been peeping in her window at night, watching her undress. "Hank & Mike" is an absurd, quirky comedy, well worth watching if you like absurb, quirky comedies. What was missing were well-developed subplots to prevent the storyline from becoming too flat and stagnant. Joe Montegna's talent is wasted as the brooding CEO whose hands are tied by the ruthless capitalist Board of Directors; his character should have been more developed and more integrally involved with the struggles of the bunnies. And the charming but painful storyline of the love-interest is dropped without resolution.

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