Name: peneflix

Most Recent Reviews by peneflix

FOR ANYONE WHO LOVES TO DANCE AND APPRECIATES THOSE WITH THE GIFT. THI

Kqvowupr4rcfsthlpoxodpbwe03
Reviewed by peneflix

A misleading title. This is a "revolution" of immensely talented contemporary dancers, struggling to make their skills known to the world, Miami in particular. Under the sobriquet "The Mob" they stage and film their performances on the streets of Miami, Art Museums, City Hall. They are competing for a grand YouTube prize; they have to garnish the "hits".

The silly, soapy, predictable scenario does not detract from the best choreography seen on today's screen; gifted young dancers whose aerobic liquidity, fluidity, levity defies gravity; every sequence exponentially outshines the previous one; brilliant, stunning moves, tightly, perfectly scripted staging; this "revolution" is awe-inspiring.

Founders of "The Mob": "Sean" (Ryan Guzman) and "Eddy" (Misha Hamilton) poor boys whose neighborhood is targeted for demolition by mega-hotelier (unsurprisingly, the "ugly" capitalist) "Bill Anderson" (Peter Gallagher), wanting the glitzy, glamorous side of Miami to recognize their legitimate contribution to the cultural depth of the city.

Sean meets "Emily" (Kathryn McCormick) unaware that she is the daughter of Mr. Anderson; their first number is a sensual, sinuous, sensational duet; a pairing reminiscent of George Bernard Shaw's statement that "dancing is a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire"; simmering potency, conveying in movement a language, words could never achieve.

Creativity abounds, amazes; all ethnicities dazzle, every solo unique unto the individual; breathless, refreshing entertainment.

Beth Jones says "to dance is to reach for a word that doesn't exist". "Step Up Revolution" speaks volumes about the extraordinary power of dance to convey joy, pain, healing; dance has alchemical properties capable of transforming individuals, communities, continents.

THREE STARS!!!

For Now.....Peneflix

***Visit peneflix.com!!!

Rate Review
Arrow_up_light
0
Arrow_down_light
0

A DISAPPOINTING FLICK ABOUT THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE PARANORMAL. SOLID C

Iingtxuho2odecci7e6of7oeask
Reviewed by peneflix

Slick, sophisticated beginning, quickly sinks into mediocrity, partially because director Rodrigo Cortes's ambitious mission and script are too erudite; his preoccupation and ardour of science and the cloudy, empirical world of the paranormal becomes detrimental, confusing; looses its path and the audience.

Sigourney Weaver plays "Dr. Margaret Matheson" a psychologist specializing in debunking, exposing sensational, charlatan psychics. The part was written with her in mind and she owns it completely. She is assisted by "Tom Buckley" (gifted, beautiful Irish actor, Cillian Murphy, at first viable, flounders, fades as a legitimate scientist); the power of the film rests in their relationship; in one classroom scene they demonstrate how the paranormal mystique can be achieved by slight of hand, diversion, chiaroscuro . It was a partnership that, with a rewrite could have earned the film another star.

Robert De Niro, as blind "Simon Silver" the slimiest and most renown of the psychics, emerges after a thirty-year hiatus, to taunt and tempt the disbelievers; mesmerize, followers; his ranting oratories, enhanced by pyrotechnics, gimmicks at the Cirque du Soleil level, veins popping, screaming at a preacher's pitch are laughable annoyances.

Elizabeth Olsen is totally miscast as "Sally" a precocious student, romantically involved with Tom. "Sally", sadly should have been eliminated from the script; her mundane lines, and affected intelligence were an embarrassing distraction; largest sin: the complete lack of chemistry between she and Tom.

In conclusion Cortes should have paid heed to Occam's Razor: "Red Lights" lacked an economy of succinctness; inaccessible, unsatisfying solutions, to the unnatural occurrences of the inexplicable phenomena of the paranormal.

TWO STARS!!

For Now.....Peneflix

Rate Review
Arrow_up_light
0
Arrow_down_light
0

THOMAS HARDY'S 19TH CENTURY ENGLISH NOVEL "TESS OF d'URBERVILLES' TRAN

Wj9bz3nesr6shl0oyafwtovrlir
Reviewed by peneflix

If you have never ventured, but always wondered, lusted for the exotic, compelling mystique of India, "Trishna" dishes up a savory cacophony of sounds, sights, contrasts so vividly realistic, pulsating with polluted, congested, dark, dusky corridors, blinding, sun- scorched fields, man and mammal wedded by culture and necessity; still imbued with a "class" conscious, constricted society; director Michael Winterbottom, without obfuscation, paints the myriad of flaws, fallacies, magical beauty, torturous poverty of this enigmatic world, almost to the point of distraction; the plot is secondary to the seductive, secretive lure of this exhilarating, turbulent, fascinating country.

"Trishna" is an updated version of Thomas Hardy's 1891, "Tess of the d'Urbervilles"; Victorian England, women still hibernating in the "chattel age"; commencement of the Industrial Revolution; beautiful "Tess" of diminished wealth and proper credentials, limited choices, grapples archaic restrictions, interacts with the gentry determining her fate in late nineteenth century. The book is a classic and it was with trepidation that I ventured into "Trishna" , mimicking the bonds of "Tess" in twenty- first century India.

India, still in postpartum turmoil; adjusting to democracy; a burgeoning economy; graft among its leaders; vast explosion of humanity; trying to sever the ancient hubris of "class". India was the perfect venue for the Hardy's scenario; he would have been satisfied with the interpretation.

The heart, core and success of the film rests with the intoxicating performance of Freida Pinto as "Trishna"; quietly, pristinely innocent, oblivious of her beauty, devoid of options she contributes to the survival of her family by working as a hostess in a tourist resort. Enter "Jay" of Indian heritage, raised in England, ignorant of his native tongue but dumbfounded by the virginal, breathtaking, surreal naivety of Trishna; in their first encounters she refers to him as "sir"; his hierarchy (class) untouchable, unattainable. Riz Ahmed as Jay is prodigious as the handsome, spoiled, feckless cad who hires Trishna to work in one of his father's hotels.

As the film progresses from the mighty and feeble in Rajasthan to the elite and sophisticated in Mumbai we witness the transformation of Trishna and Jay, from idyllic to sycophantic to destined. Trishna blossoms from child to sensual maturity, always with a touch of fatalism; control of her future illusive, a mirage of her imagination. Pinto is illuminating in the role.

The pungent pulse of India simmers throughout the predictable plot; enervating heat cloaks the occupants in overcrowded buses; airless huts harboring neglected, partially clothed children; barefoot, colorful, sari-clad, women working in bleak, dungeon-like factories for a few rupees a day; contrasted with the Olympic grandeur, dancing splendor of India's resplendence resorts. Winterbottom grasps the dichotomies, dynamics, dimensions of India and shares his astuteness with the world!

THREE & 1/2 STARS!!!

For Now.....Peneflix

Rate Review
Arrow_up_light
0
Arrow_down_light
0

A disappointing French film focusing on the death of the Monarchy, Rev

Icsh43u6pxij7vkc0oomu71ppjf
Reviewed by peneflix

It is rare, but at times one recognizes a well-made film, beautifully-acted, a tale resonating with verisimilitude but fails to entice, engross or fully entertain ; "Farewell, My Queen" falls into this category.

July 14, 1789, Versailles, France; King Louis XVI, and Queen Marie Antoinette are about to meet their historical fates; the imminent bombarding of the Bastille; luxury interspersed with mewing, starving locals; torrid tension between masters and servants; the stage is set for final farewells. Director Benoit Jacquot's focus is on three women with colossal complexities: Marie Antoinette (faceted, sensitive performance by Diane Kruger) spoiled, sculpted by her title and jewels, agonizing and positively fearful of the demise of her greatest passion, "Gabrielle de Polignac" (blandly, beautiful Virginie Ledoyen); "Sidonie Laborde" lady-in-waiting, the Queen's reader (forceful, intriguing performance by Lea Seydoux), her love and devotion for the Queen (largely unreciprocated, but positively expected) dangerously flirts with the destructive; she is intelligent but defined and refined by her idolatrous, royal obsession. Seydoux grasps the crux of Laborde and never relinquishes her custody of the role.

Jacquot is successful in depicting the foppery and foibles of the monarchy, myopia and sycophancy of those closeted at Versailles (a gilded prison); ironically, their only means of escape, is disguised as the meager citizens they, without conscience had raped for generations, denying them their inalienable rights.

What was extremely problematic and robbed the film of enjoyment was the hand-held camera; the intimacy was annoying to the point of nausea, vertigo; every pore, bead of perspiration, mole, disheveled, powdered wig was nastily shoveled at the viewer; perspective eliminated by bludgeoning, over-exposure, exploitation of the senses, by this popular, but in this instance failed, filming technique. It was also dark to the point of drudgery, with the exception of the shimmering opulence, magnificent halls of Versailles; a resplendent metaphor of why their privileged, entitled world, toppled.

TWO & 1/2 STARS!!

For Now.....Peneflix

Rate Review
Arrow_up_light
0
Arrow_down_light
0

A fabulous film about getting what you wish for; perfect summer flick!

1mgwxxdkv7sqrrcb4qaq3hzl8xe
Reviewed by peneflix

Anyone who has had their first brush with adolescence has fantasized about the perfect partner; the one who completes the puzzle, the conundrum that is "you"; conforms to your ideal; meets and exceeds all your expectations; plainly put, the "love of your life."

"Ruby Sparks" is one of the most compelling, enchanting films of the summer. Created by, and starring Zoe Kazan ("Ruby"), a gifted young woman with an enviable imagination, celestial blue eyes. Ruby's ethereal, luminescent, stunning as the sprite who morphs from the pages of novelist "Calvin" (Paul Dano); a prodigy, who has been wandering in a desert of "wordless" uncertainty. Dano's performance is galvanizing and vulnerable, simultaneously.

I was ambushed emotionally, psychologically, intellectually from the first scene; a lonely, uninspired "genius", Calvin searches for answers on the couch of physiatrist, Dr. Rosenthal , (a small, Freudian role by a wonderfully ageing Elliott Gould); he gives Calvin an assignment and "Ruby" bursts forth, his "Venus", slaughtering writers-block, solitude; loving without boundaries, restrictions. Calvin, a contemporary Pygmalion, with language, sculpts his muse; her lineage, her moods, accomplishments, all that she is, at his creative whim.

"Ruby Sparks" speaks in a myriad of tongues; the simplistic turns complex; enchantment births disenchantment; the adage "be careful what you wish for, …" becomes imperturbable, deleterious.

"Ruby Sparks" is an eloquent, romantic comedy with exhilarating depth; scrutinizing the pathos, turbulence of relationships. How often have we said "if only" he/she were: taller, thinner, brighter, did not snore, smoke, leave hair in the sink, the lights on, interrupt, clean up, etc. If only he/she liked opera/baseball, Indian/French cuisine, fiction/nonfiction; instead of questioning what's missing, discover, unearth what's there.

"Ruby Sparks" elucidates while entertaining, a dynamic duo; a film that surreptitiously enables the viewer to ponder, examine their relationships, exiting, asking not "what you can do for me, but what can I do for you?"

"Ruby Sparks" is about freedom, acceptance; serving a tale of love as refreshing as the quietest breeze on a sweltering summer day!

FOUR STARS!!!!

For Now.....Peneflix

Rate Review
Arrow_up_light
0
Arrow_down_light
0